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Press
2005
  • ProgressiveWorld
    In 2005, it seems almost redundant to tell those in the know that Israel has made some serious progress in the field of the iconoclastic RIO, but for those who haven't been following the genre closely, you have been warned. Now, Kruzenshtern I Parohod isn't quite a RIO band, but rather a jazz ensemble in the more angular fashion of well-known composers and performers like John Zorn. The borders between those two do become blurry on the sporadic moment, however, and this is one of them, so that select RIO followers will be interested in what this unit has to offer: a schizophrenic collection of tracks that draws on such diverse influences (whether intended or not) as death metal, Primus, Israeli folk music, Mike Patton, standard jazz, surf rock, The Melvins, the aforementioned Zorn, and a host of other styles. Sound spastic? Read more...



  • Ground and sky
    One needn't look very far these days to see innovation in and around Jewish music. From the klezmer influences in groups like Alamaailman Vasarat to the Masada project and the entire "Radical Jewish Culture" series on Tzadik to Mogwai's My Father My King, there's a lot of great stuff out there building off of the rich tradition of Jewish music. Add Kruzenshtern & Parohod to that list. Read more...



  • The Mag
    I've been dying to get the cling film off of this record for ages, ever since the pastel-shaded artwork popped it's intriguing cartoon-village in front of me when I opened the envelope. The only thing is, I'm not sure that the words exist to describe this marvel of an album from Tel-Aviv experimentalists, Kruzenshtern and Parohod. Oh well, here goes anyway... Read more...



  • Kinda Music (Dutch)
    Sinds de avantgardisten John Zorn, Matt Darriau en Frank London zich stortten op hun joodse achtergrond, regende het New Yorkse cd’s vol klezmer- en andere joodse invloeden. Op het Tzadik-label en bij Knitting Factory verschenen de afgelopen tien jaar meer dan honderd cd’s met in Europa grotendeels onbekende muzikanten. Als het geen ‘Radical Jewish Culture’ heette, dan was het wel de ‘Jewish Alternative Movement’. Muzikaal was er geen eenheid in te ontdekken. Soms waren het cross-overs van klezmer met latinmuziek of jazz, vaak was het slechts de religieuze achtergrond van de betrokken muzikant die de doorslag gaf. Read more...





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